YEAR OF THE ROOSTER

las vegas dj events planner

I am the little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day
I am the little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day

– Little Red Rooster as performed by the Rolling Stones

Never mind crowing for the day, because it’s Chinese New Year for the next 7 days and it’s the year of the rooster no less… and this rooster has plenty to crow about with celebratory festivities commencing Jan. 27 and stretching through Feb. 2.

FAB FACT: Rooster years are believed to be the most unlucky for people born in a year of the Rooster.

I’ll be brutally honest, I was not as well versed in all things CNY as I thought. Strolling through the Bellagio Conservatory once a year as beautiful as it is and dining at Chin Chin or God forbid Panda Express does not constitute celebrating this most salient holiday that is observed by 1/5th of the world’s population.

Chinese New Year, also known as Spring Festival in China, is China’s most important traditional festival. It is also the most important celebration for families, and a week of official public holiday.

So, why do people celebrate Chinese New Year? Although there are many interesting legends and stories explaining the origins of the Chinese New Year festival, the main two reasons for the festival are:

  • To celebrate a year of hard work, have a good rest, and relax with family
  • To wish for a lucky and prosperous coming year

Chinese people believe that a good start to the year will lead to a lucky year. Chinese traditionally celebrated the start of a new year of farm work and wished for a good harvest (when most were farmers). This has now evolved to celebrating the start of a new business year and wishing for profits and success in various vocations.

FAB FACT: Red envelopes are used in the hope of giving good luck (as well as money) to the recipients.

Like Christmas in the West, people exchange gifts during the Spring Festival. The most common gifts are red envelopes. Red envelopes contain money and are given to children and (retired) seniors. It is not a custom to give red envelopes to (working) adults, except by employers.

FAB FACT: “Xīnnián kuàilè!” (新年快乐) means “Happy New Year!” That’s pronounced “sshin-nyen kwhy-luh,” by the way.

As a Las Vegas party planner in the know with moves like Jagger including the “Rooster Walk,” I can tell you there is no shortage of events here in Las Vegas to enjoy whether you are of the Asian persuasion or not. So put down the Ramen noodles (“No MSG”), and get ready to dragon dance down “The Strip” to take in an exhibit, celebration, and festival.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

  • Chinese New Year – Year of the Rooster art exhibit: This exhibit explores China’s most important traditional festival. Daily, free, Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St., 702-229-1012.

*Also: Artwork on display through Mar. 4.

  • Chinese New Year Celebration: To celebrate the Year of the Rooster, the LINQ Promenade hosts a four-day festival 6-9 p.m., free, LINQ Promenade, 3545 Las Vegas Blvd. South, 800-634-6441.

*Also: 1:30-9 p.m. Jan. 28-29, 6-9 p.m. Jan. 30.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28

  • Chinese New Year in the Desert: The festival will feature performances by the Sichuan Song and Dance Theatre Co., the Las Vegas Spring Festival Parade, lantern-building activities, an eye-painting ceremony, and more. Times vary, free, locations vary, www.cnyinthedesert.com.

*Also: Jan. 29-30.

FAB FACT: It has long been a Chinese tradition to set off firecrackers when the New Year clock strikes.

The tradition is to set off one string of small firecrackers first, followed by three big firecrackers, which symbolize “sounding out” the old year and “sounding in” the new year. The louder the three firecrackers, the better and luckier it’s believed it will be for business and farming in the coming year.

So set off some firecrackers and say “Goodbye old year, welcome new year!” Like a half-order of carry-out pork fried rice, Chinese New Year offers a lot of satisfaction over this next week. And remember… “You can be a rooster one day and a feather duster the next.”

Cock-a-doodle-do,
Belinda

Sources:

Little Red Rooster Written by Willie Dixon • Copyright © BMG Rights Management US, LLC
Rooster Quotes & Sayings – Frank McManus

www.chinahighlights.com

Albumpalooza © 2018. Used with permission from Live Music in Vegas Inc. Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.